July 18, 2014

tomorrowsofyesterday:

So @TheCapitolPN tweeted this
image

which was promptly deleted. (G-Bb-A-D are the notes to Rue’s whistle.)

But if you had clicked inspect element before it was deleted

image

"You silence our voices, but we are still heard."

HOW COOL IS THIS MARKETING?!?! Like the rebels are hacking into the capitol’s twitter!!!!

(Thanks toastbabeis and mockingjaysource for noticing it and jenliamjosh for reblogging)

(via popculturebrain)

July 17, 2014

Anonymous said: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

July 10, 2014
July 8, 2014
July 6, 2014
disneypixar:

Slow and steady…

Me running

disneypixar:

Slow and steady…

Me running

July 5, 2014
rolluptheclouds:

humansofwarwick:

"Where are you from?""India.""What was your biggest culture shock?""The weather!"

Haha I feel this! I was an undergrad in Warwick too, so that’s 3 years of UK weather. And yet, I struggled to adjust to it when I returned here to do my postgrad. I complained about cold classrooms, cold afternoons, cold nights, 4pm sunsets, daylights savings in general. (I’m a weather whiner?)
It was a relief when summer rolled around and I could shed those extra layers and also smugly message my family groups on Whatsapp, “Hey it’s kinda hot today.” I’m sure they pitied my lowering standards - British sun can’t compare with Southeast Asian heat.
But even in the summer, there’s still rainy days and chilly days, and I never did buy a good lightweight jacket for either. So there’s still mornings when I fret over what to wear. Wear a jacket? Wear socks? Bring a scarf? What’s my protection against the rain? Ugh.
In Brunei, jackets are only for cinemas, ridiculously cold air-conditioned offices, and for looking cool when hanging out at a shopping mall. Otherwise, one layer of clothing is good enough for everyone. If it rains, you either stay put in said mall and wait for your family members to pick you up, or calmly take out your umbrella and walk to your car. (This is a generalisation but possibly not a huge one.)
Bonus factoid: If it rains and you are in Brunei and you are playing Ultimate, then either rain is nothing to you and you’re already out there sliding across the increasingly slippery field; or you (like me) say something lame about disliking the feel of rain on your head, and you primly pack up your things and say you’re done for the day.

I love Hazirah’s commentary! Such lovely writing!

rolluptheclouds:

humansofwarwick:

"Where are you from?"
"India."
"What was your biggest culture shock?"
"The weather!"

Haha I feel this! I was an undergrad in Warwick too, so that’s 3 years of UK weather. And yet, I struggled to adjust to it when I returned here to do my postgrad. I complained about cold classrooms, cold afternoons, cold nights, 4pm sunsets, daylights savings in general. (I’m a weather whiner?)

It was a relief when summer rolled around and I could shed those extra layers and also smugly message my family groups on Whatsapp, “Hey it’s kinda hot today.” I’m sure they pitied my lowering standards - British sun can’t compare with Southeast Asian heat.

But even in the summer, there’s still rainy days and chilly days, and I never did buy a good lightweight jacket for either. So there’s still mornings when I fret over what to wear. Wear a jacket? Wear socks? Bring a scarf? What’s my protection against the rain? Ugh.

In Brunei, jackets are only for cinemas, ridiculously cold air-conditioned offices, and for looking cool when hanging out at a shopping mall. Otherwise, one layer of clothing is good enough for everyone. If it rains, you either stay put in said mall and wait for your family members to pick you up, or calmly take out your umbrella and walk to your car. (This is a generalisation but possibly not a huge one.)

Bonus factoid: If it rains and you are in Brunei and you are playing Ultimate, then either rain is nothing to you and you’re already out there sliding across the increasingly slippery field; or you (like me) say something lame about disliking the feel of rain on your head, and you primly pack up your things and say you’re done for the day.

I love Hazirah’s commentary! Such lovely writing!

July 1, 2014

bglv5:

emmajoy6992:

alexismroark:

tairupanda:

derschneefiel:

The Pallas´s Cat, also called Manul, is a small wildcat living in the grasslands and steppe of central asia.
It is named after the german naturalist Peter Simon Pallas, who first described the species in 1776.

That is the most expressive and gelatinous cat I have ever seen.

LOL

Wait…that’s real?! 

Yup!

(via asongforjuliet)

June 29, 2014

michaeldantedimartino:

metaboo:

The entirety of my Legend of Korra’s Book 3 Countdown! I hope you enjoyed it! (´・ᴗ・`)

Wow!

June 25, 2014

She’s Electric - Oasis

(Source: scatteredtunes, via scruplesthecat)